The Hill’s Whip List: 19 GOP no votes on new ObamaCare replacement bill – The Hill

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The Hill’s Whip List: 19 GOP no votes on new ObamaCare replacement bill – The Hillby wpjljron.The Hill’s Whip List: 19 GOP no votes on new ObamaCare replacement bill – The HillHouse Republicans have an updated bill to repeal and replace ObamaCare, and The Hill has a new whip list. The updated bill includes an amendment that would allow states to opt out of key ObamaCare rules, including on minimum coverage requirements and allowing insurers to charge more based on individuals’ health. Those changes are designed […]

House Republicans have an updated bill to repeal and replace ObamaCare, and The Hill has a new whip list.

The updated bill includes an amendment that would allow states to opt out of key ObamaCare rules, including on minimum coverage requirements and allowing insurers to charge more based on individuals’ health.

Those changes are designed to win over conservatives, and the new legislation has been backed by the House Freedom Caucus and outside groups including the Club for Growth and FreedomWorks.

The question is whether GOP centrists can back it.

A mix of centrists and conservatives objected to the earlier ObamaCare bill, forcing GOP leaders to call off a planned vote.

No Democrats are expected to vote for the measure, meaning Republicans can only afford 22 defections.

Below is an initial list of where key Republicans stand based on an earlier Whip List from The Hill and lawmakers’ statements on the new amendment.

The list will be continually updated. Please send updates to [email protected]

This list was last updated on April 27 at 4:37 p.m.

Recent updates: Reps. Ted YohoTed YohoThe Hill’s Whip List: 19 GOP no votes on new ObamaCare replacement bill The ‘zero-for-zero’ policy on sugar could be a roadmap forward for the US on trade Why an independent counsel is necessary in an election probe MORE (Fla.), Mike Coffman (Colo.) and Ryan Costello (Pa.).

 

NO (19)

Rep. Andy Biggs (Ariz.) — “The MacArthur amendment is an effort to make the AHCA better, but it does not meet my constituents’ threshold for repeal,” the Freedom Caucus member said. Biggs was a no on the first bill.

Rep. Mike Coffman (Colo.) — Coffman told Politico he is currently a no.

Rep. Barbara Comstock (Va.) — The centrist Republican told The Hill she is still a no. Comstock is one of Democrats’ top targets in 2018.

Rep. Ryan Costello (Pa.) — Costello told reporters Thursday he was a no.

Rep. Jeff Denham (Calif.) — Denham told The Hill he was a no on Wednesday.

Rep. Charlie Dent (Pa.) — The co-chairman of the centrist Tuesday Group is still a no.

Rep. Dan Donovan (N.Y.) — The freshman lawmaker told The Hill on Wednesday he still plans to vote no.

Rep. Brian Fitzpatrick (Pa.) — A centrist, Fitzpatrick is still a no.

Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler (Wash.) — Herrera Beutler, a member of the Tuesday Group, is a no, CNN reported.

Rep. Walter Jones (N.C.) — Jones, who has bucked GOP leaders on a number of occasions, is still a no.

Rep. John Katko (N.Y.) — Katko is still a no. “To me, it doesn’t move the needle enough,” he told Syracuse.com. Democratic presidential nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Rodham ClintonMeghan McCain: Obama ‘a dirty capitalist like the rest of us’ Democrats must have a better response on net neutrality than simply ‘no’ Obama shamefully lines pockets with 0K for Wall Street speech MORE won Katko’s district in November.

Rep. Leonard Lance (N.J.) — Lance is still a no.

Rep. Frank LoBiondo (N.J.) — LoBiondo is still voting no despite potential changes.

Rep. Thomas Massie (Ky.) — Massie, a conservative who is not in the Freedom Caucus, said he is still a no.

Rep. Patrick Meehan (Pa.) — Meehan said the revised bill would raise premiums for those with pre-existing conditions and older Americans.

Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (Fla.) — The centrist Republican from south Florida said she is still a no even with the amendment. Clinton won Ros-Lehtinen’s district by nearly 20 points in 2016.

Rep. Chris Smith (N.J.) — Smith told ABC he is still a no. The New Jersey lawmaker is meeting with leaders Thursday.

Rep. Daniel Webster (Fla.) — Webster is still a no. The Florida lawmaker wants changes that provide more Medicaid funding for nursing homes.

Rep. David Young (Iowa) — Young told reporters he is still a no. A Paul Ryan-aligned super PAC pulled their support for him after his decision not to back the initial bill in March.

 

UNDECIDED/UNCLEAR (57)

Rep. Justin Amash (Mich.) — The Freedom Caucus member is reviewing the changes, according to Politico. He was a no in March.

Rep. Mark Amodei (Nev.) — Amodei was a no on the first bill.

Rep. Brian Babin (Texas) — The Texas lawmaker, a former member of the Freedom Caucus, was yes on the first bill.

Rep. Rob Bishop (Utah) — Bishop was undecided on the first bill.

Rep. Rod Blum (Iowa) — Freedom Caucus member was a no on the first bill.

Rep. Ken Buck (Colo.)  Buck supported the first bill.

Rep. Ted Budd (N.C.) — The freshman lawmaker was a no on the first bill. Budd was backed by Club for Growth in the 2016 election. The conservative group opposed the earlier GOP bill but now supports it.

Rep. Paul Cook (Calif.)  Cook was undecided on the first bill.

Rep. Rick Crawford (Ark.) — Crawford was a no on the first bill.

Rep. John Culberson (Texas)  Culberson was undecided on the first bill.

Rep. Carlos Curbelo (Fla.) — Curbelo told The Hill on Wednesday he was undecided on the revised bill.

Rep. Warren Davidson (Ohio) ­— Davidson was undecided on the first bill.

Rep. Ron DeSantis (Fla.) — DeSantis was undecided on the first bill.

Rep. Mario Diaz-Balart (Fla.) — A centrist, Diaz-Balart voted to advance the first bill in the House Budget Committee but said he had “serious concerns.”

Rep. Jeff Duncan (S.C.) — Duncan, a Freedom Caucus member, was a lean no on the first bill.

Rep. Neal Dunn (Fla.) — Dunn was undecided on the first bill.

Rep. Tom Emmer (Minn.) — Emmer was undecided on the first bill.

Rep. Ron Estes (Kan.) — Sworn in this week, Estes says he needs to review the changes.

Rep. John Faso (N.Y.)  Faso was undecided on the first bill and expressed concerns about removing minimum insurer coverage requirements.

Rep. Jeff Fortenberry (Neb.)

Rep. Trent Franks (Ariz.)  The Freedom Caucus member was undecided on the first bill.

Rep. Rodney Frelinghuysen (N.J.) — The chairman of the Appropriations Committee was a no on the first bill.

Rep. Tom Garrett (Va.) — Garrett was a no on the first bill.

Rep. Louie Gohmert (Texas) — The Freedom Caucus member was a no on the first bill.

Rep. Paul Gosar (Ariz.)  Gosar was undecided on the first bill.

Rep. Andy Harris (Md.) — Harris was a no on the first bill.

Rep. Duncan Hunter (Calif.)  — Hunter was undecided on the first bill.

Rep. Will Hurd (Texas) — Hurd was undecided on the first bill.

Rep. Darrell Issa (Calif.) — Issa declined to share his position on Wednesday. On the last bill, he was a likely yes.

Rep. Mike Johnson (La.) — Johnson was undecided on the first bill.

Rep. David Joyce (Ohio) — Joyce, formerly a no, said Tuesday he is undecided.

Rep. Trent Kelly (Miss.) — Kelly was undecided on the first bill.

Rep. Pete King (N.Y.) — King was leaning no on the first bill.

Rep. Adam Kinzinger (Ill.) — Kinzinger is undecided. He was a yes on the earlier bill.

Rep. Steve Knight (Calif.) — Knight was undecided on the first bill.

Rep. David Kustoff (Tenn.) — Kustoff was undecided on the first bill.

Rep. Raúl Labrador (Idaho) — The Freedom Caucus member was a no on the first bill.

Rep. Doug LaMalfa (Calif.) — LaMalfa was undecided on the first bill.

Rep. Mia Love (Utah)  Love was undecided on the first bill.

Rep. Brian Mast (Fla.) — Mast told CNN he is undecided on the new bill. Mast was a lean yes on the first bill.

Rep. Michael McCaul (Texas) — McCaul was undecided on the first bill.

Rep. Steve Pearce (N.M.) — Pearce was a lean no on the first bill.

Rep. Scott Perry (Pa.) — Perry was a lean no on the first bill.

Rep. Bruce Poliquin (Maine) — Poliquin, a centrist, was undecided on the first bill.

Rep. Ted Poe (Texas) — Poe was a yes on the first bill.

Rep. Bill Posey (Fla.) — Posey was a no on the first bill.

Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (Calif.) — Rohrabacher was undecided on the first bill.

Rep. Ed Royce (Calif.) — The House Foreign Affairs chairman is undecided and has serious concerns with the revised bill, a spokesperson told The Hill.

Rep. Elise Stefanik (N.Y.) — A member of the Tuesday Group, Stefanik was undecided on the first bill.

Rep. Glenn Thompson (Pa.) — Thompson was a no on the first bill.

Rep. Fred Upton (Mich.) — Upton was a yes but is now undecided. He voted to advance the bill on the House Energy and Commerce Committee.

Rep. David Valadao (Calif.)  Valadao was undecided on the first bill.

Rep. Randy Weber (Texas) — The Freedom Caucus member was undecided on the first bill.

Rep. Brad Wenstrup (Ohio) — Wenstrup was undecided on the first bill.

Rep. Rob Wittman (Va.) — Wittman was a no on the first bill.

Rep. Kevin Yoder (Kan.) 

Rep. Don Young (Alaska) — Young was a lean no on the first bill.

 

YES (10)

Rep. Ralph Abraham (La.) — Abraham also backed the first bill.

Rep. Dave Brat (Va.) — The Freedom Caucus member is now a yes.

Rep. Mo Brooks (Ala.)  — The Freedom Caucus member was a no, but is now supports the revised bill..

Rep. Scott DesJarlais (Tenn.) — The Freedom Caucus member says he’ll support the bill now with the changes. He was a no in March.

Rep. Jody Hice (Ga.) — Hice, a Freedom Caucus member, is a yes on the revised bill. In a statement, he said he supported the bill, but added, “the battle for a full repeal is not over.”

Rep. Jim Jordan (Ohio) — Jordan, a former chairman of the House Freedom Caucus, is now a yes. “It is our best chance to pass a bill through the House that will actually reduce the cost of health insurance for everyday Americans,” he said Wednesday.

Rep. Tom MacArthur (N.J.) — The leader of the centrist Tuesday Group negotiated the changes to the bill.

Rep. Mark Meadows (N.C.) — The leader of the House Freedom Caucus negotiated the changes with MacArthur.

Rep. Mark Sanford (S.C.) — Sanford, a member of the Freedom Caucus, flipped to yes from no after the changes.

Rep. Ted Yoho (Fla.)  Yoho, a Freedom Caucus member, told Fox News he is a “yes, under duress.” Yoho was a no on the first bill.

 

LEAN/LIKELY YES (1)

Rep. Tom Reed (N.Y.) — Reed is now a lean yes. He voted the first bill out of the Ways and Means Committee.

Source Article from http://thehill.com/homenews/news/330717-the-hills-whip-list-who-to-watch-on-gops-new-obamacare-bill

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