Quantum Mechanics 11a – Chemistry

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Quantum Mechanics 11a – Chemistryby wpjljron.Quantum Mechanics 11a – ChemistryA great triumph of quantum mechanics is that it provides a quantitative description of chemical bonds. It thus forms the theoretical basis for all of chemistry.

A great triumph of quantum mechanics is that it provides a quantitative description of chemical bonds. It thus forms the theoretical basis for all of chemistry.

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10 Responses

  1. Tunatunatun30 December, 2014 at 12:33 am

    Yes yes yes yes yes yes yes new video!!! These are IMHO the best around for
    learning basic QM interpretation and explanations for curious people like
    me. Thank you again, Oz! Hope to see part B soon! 

  2. Thorakites29 December, 2014 at 8:28 pm

    Do you see yourself making quantum field theory (perhaps even the three
    force theories and standard model) videos in the semi-distant future? I’d
    love to see your overview of those subjects, but I know that would be quite
    the undertaking.

  3. schitlipz29 December, 2014 at 7:52 pm

    Around @12:12 you show how the H atoms come together and temporarily
    oscillate. Does this radiate a detectable far field? The frequency noted
    seems to be in the infrared/microwave region, so I guess I’m just wondering
    how easily this can be detected.

    I remeber in a chemistry lab where we passed a current through a tube
    containing hydrogen gas and observing a blue/violet colour. Perhaps my
    memory is a bit hazy. I don’t recall the prof. speaking of this kind of
    oscillation that you have demonstrated so well in an abstract way.

  4. The Sandre Guy29 December, 2014 at 7:49 pm

    +viascience As an actual chemistry student (3 years of bachelor degree
    studies + Six months in of another 2 years of masters studies; in the
    fields of quantum chemistry / nuclear chemistry) I do feel the need to
    point out that also *classical mechanics* and not just *quantum mechanics*,
    play a big role in chemistry as well.

  5. TheResidentSkeptic29 December, 2014 at 6:06 pm

    What happened to the Ozmoroid channel? I miss some of those videos 🙁
    Particularly the one about Bill Nye and Ken Ham’s debate.

  6. TomatoBreadOrgasm29 December, 2014 at 3:59 pm

    This actually made me bust out McQuarrie for a bit of nostalgia. Good to
    have you back.

  7. SvinehundenVlog29 December, 2014 at 2:20 pm

    13:47 Looks like a spiral in a 2D perspective.

  8. RyuDarragh29 December, 2014 at 1:07 pm

    Newton was sooo close. That describes electrical force between nuclei and
    electrons.

  9. inphuriated29 December, 2014 at 10:35 am

    Great video! I think. So far beyond me that it’s not even funny anymore :/ 

  10. David Rutten29 December, 2014 at 9:59 am

    I’m surprised the electron orbit of the far-apart configuration at 14:10
    becomes oriented with the secondary ellipse focal point /away/ from the
    bare proton. If the second proton attracts the electron, wouldn’t the orbit
    deform so that the electron is (on average) somewhat closer to the second
    proton rather than somewhat further away?

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