How to Build a Worm

Category : For the DIY'er
How to Build a Wormby wpjljron.How to Build a WormPhilosopher of Biology Paul Nelson describes the amazing process by which the worm C. elegans is constructed and how it points toward intelligent design. For more about the intelligent design…

Philosopher of Biology Paul Nelson describes the amazing process by which the worm C. elegans is constructed and how it points toward intelligent design. For more about the intelligent design…

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12 Responses

  1. Vimal Ramachandran16 April, 2015 at 12:18 pm

    This is nonsense. Paul Nelson, you’re making the mistake of looking at the
    end result – a worm with muscle, nerves, germ cells and intestine – and
    concluding that this was the only possible outcome. Therefore, everything
    should have been programmed upfront to produce this particular creature
    with this particular characteristic.

    You then liken this to human architects who plan ahead to work towards a
    pre-decided end result. But this is wrong and you won’t understand
    evolution unless you free yourself from such teleological thinking.

    We know of even simpler animals that don’t have such well-differentiated
    tissues or developmental patterns – sponges, cnidarians, ctenophores,
    placozoans, all of which are evolutionarily even more ancient than C.
    elegans. Thus, we can see that animals don’t have to have nerves and
    muscles to survive, they started out as mere colonies of daughter cells,
    gradually acquiring specializations through evolutionary time. Different
    mutations produced different animal lineages which went different ways. One
    lineage led to the ancestor of C. elegans and its cousins including us.

    Random chance events and adaptation can explain this because the way C.
    elegans ended up was just one among countless possible outcomes, out of
    which only one outcome stuck. This outcome stayed on because it was good
    enough to produce a creature that can survive enough to reproduce in its
    given environment. Likewise, another outcome stayed on for placozoans and
    yet another outcome stuck for sponges.

    It is wrong to look at the end result and see teleology. Rather, you must
    appreciate the role of how chance and contingency can produce diverse
    patterns from a simple beginning. I’m worried about young students who will
    be misled by such wrong propaganda.

  2. Iulia Filip16 April, 2015 at 11:13 am

  3. Ari Norolampi16 April, 2015 at 10:24 am

  4. Vaughn Mancha16 April, 2015 at 3:01 am

  5. Dave Johnson16 April, 2015 at 2:53 am

    Creation of new information is habitually associated with conscious activity
    -Henry Quastler

  6. sa'ad ibn Asaad Husain15 April, 2015 at 10:20 pm

    wonderful

  7. Denis Carignan15 April, 2015 at 9:56 pm

  8. Denis Carignan15 April, 2015 at 9:47 pm

  9. Et Carter15 April, 2015 at 7:55 pm

    Gorgeous production (photography, music, the whole shebang) Paul Nelson
    surprised me with the way he pulled the info together and made the ID case
    near the end. That was great!

  10. Joshua Hults15 April, 2015 at 7:05 pm

    YEA !

  11. Robert L. Crowther, II15 April, 2015 at 5:37 pm

    More evidence for intelligent design. 

  12. Judge Rez15 April, 2015 at 4:03 pm

    Excellent presentation!

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